読者です 読者をやめる 読者になる 読者になる

ミシガン大学卒業式でのオバマ演説

久しぶりに、オバマの名スピーチをお届けしたい。ミシガン大学卒業式(5月1日)でのスピーチ。
http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/remarks-president-university-michigan-spring-commencement
テーマはずばり、アメリカの民主主義。

The democracy designed by Jefferson and the other founders was never intended to solve every problem with a new law or a new program. Having thrown off the tyranny of the British Empire, the first Americans were understandably skeptical of government. And ever since we’ve held fast to the belief that government doesn’t have all the answers, and we have cherished and fiercely defended our individual freedom. That’s a strand of our nation’s DNA.

(ジェファーソンや他の建国の父たちによって設計された民主主義は、新しい法律や新しいプログラムをつくることによってすべての問題を解こうと意図したものではありません。大英帝国の圧政から逃れたばかりのアメリカ人たちは、政府の存在意義について懐疑的でした。そしてそれ以来、我々は、政府がすべての答えを知っているわけでないという確固たる信念を持ち続け、「個人の自由」を育み、擁護し続けてきました。それは我々の国のDNAなのです。)

このあと、オバマは、必ずしも共和党の大統領が小さな政府を主導したわけでなく、必ずしも民主党の大統領が大きな政府を主導したわけでない例を引きながら、大きな政府・小さな政府論よりも大事なものがあることを説く。

So, class of 2010, what we should be asking is not whether we need “big government” or a “small government,” but how we can create a smarter and better government. (Applause.) Because in an era of iPods and Tivo, where we have more choices than ever before -- even though I can't really work a lot of these things -- (laughter) -- but I have 23-year-olds who do it for me -- (laughter) -- government shouldn’t try to dictate your lives. But it should give you the tools you need to succeed. Government shouldn’t try to guarantee results, but it should guarantee a shot at opportunity for every American who’s willing to work hard. (Applause.)

(2010年卒業生のみなさん、我々が議論すべきなのは大きな政府か小さな政府かではなく、どのようにして賢くより良い政府をつくることができるかなのです。iPodとTivoの時代には、我々にはかつての時代よりも多様な選択肢がありますから、政府はあなたがたの生活にいちいち口出しすべきではありません(笑)。しかし、政府はあなたがたが成功するのに必要な道具を与えるべきです。政府は結果について保証すべきでなく、懸命に働こうとするすべてのアメリカ人に機会を保証すべきです。)

そしてオバマは卒業生たちに、民主主義に欠くべからざる要素は何らかの方法での「参加」だと語り、次のメッセージを送る。

It was 50 years ago that a young candidate for president came here to Michigan and delivered a speech that inspired one of the most successful service projects in American history. And as John F. Kennedy described the ideals behind what would become the Peace Corps, he issued a challenge to the students who had assembled in Ann Arbor on that October night: “on your willingness to contribute part of your life to this country,” he said, will depend the answer whether a free society can compete. I think it can,” he said.

(50年前、大統領候補時代のジョン・F・ケネディがここミシガン大学を訪れ、ある演説をしました。それが、アメリカの歴史上もっとも成功したプロジェクトを生み出しました。そのときケネディが語ったアイデアは、
のちに平和部隊[開発途上国を援助する米国政府のボランティア活動]として実現します。その晩に集まった学生たちに、彼はある問いかけをします。「自由な社会が勝つかどうかは、この国のためにあなた方が人生の時間の一部分を提供したいと願うかどうかにかかっている。私はそれが可能だと思う」。)

This democracy we have is a precious thing. For all the arguments and all the doubts and all the cynicism that’s out there today, we should never forget that as Americans, we enjoy more freedoms and opportunities than citizens in any other nation on Earth. (Applause.) We are free to speak our mind and worship as we please. We are free to choose our leaders, and criticize them if they let us down. We have the chance to get an education, and work hard, and give our children a better life.

(我々が保持している民主主義は貴重なものです。アメリカについて様々な議論や疑念、シニシズムが存在することは百も承知だけれど、我々はアメリカ人として、地球上の他のどの国の市民よりも多くの自由と機会を享受しているということを、けっして忘れてはなりません。我々には好きなだけ、自分の思いのたけを語る自由があります。我々には自分たちの指導者を選ぶ自由があり、指導者を批判する自由もあります。我々には教育を受けるチャンスがあり、一生懸命働くチャンスがあり、子供たちによりよい人生を与えるチャンスがあります。)
しかし、これらは何の努力もなく手に入るものではない、とオバマは戒める。大統領就任演説のあの厳しいトーンを彷彿とさせる。

None of this came easy. None of this was preordained. The men and women who sat in your chairs 10 years ago and 50 years ago and 100 years ago;- they made America possible through their toil and their endurance and their imagination and their faith. Their success, and America’s success, was never a given. And there is no guarantee that the graduates who will sit in these same seats 10 years from now, or 50 years from now, or 100 years from now, will enjoy the same freedoms and opportunities that you do. You, too, will have to strive. You, too, will have to push the boundaries of what seems possible. For the truth is, our nation’s destiny has never been certain.

(このうちのいずれも、何もしなくてもたやすく手に入るものではありません。いまあなたたちが座っている席に、10年前、50年前、100年前に座っていた先輩たちが、苦労を重ね、努力を重ね、想像力と信念によって我々アメリカ人にそれらをもたらしてくれたのです。彼らの成功、アメリカの成功は、けっして所与のものではありません。そして、10年後、50年後、100年後に同じ席に座る後輩たちが、あなた方と同じ自由や機会を享受できるという保証はありません。あなた方もまた、努力をし、可能な領域を押し広げなければなりません。本当のところ、我々の国の運命は決して確実なものではなかったのです。)

What is certain-- what has always been certain --is the ability to shape that destiny. That is what makes us different. That is what sets us apart. That is what makes us Americans -- our ability at the end of the day to look past all of our differences and all of our disagreements and still forge a common future. That task is now in your hands, as is the answer to the question posed at this university half a century ago about whether a free society can still compete.

If you are willing, as past generations were willing, to contribute part of your life to the life of this country, then I, like President Kennedy, believe we can. Because I believe in you. (Applause.)

(確かなこと、これまでずっと確かだったことは、アメリカの運命に形を与える能力です。それが我々アメリカ人を特別なものにしています。それが我々をアメリカ人にしているのです。要するにその能力とは、我々の特殊性を過去に探し求め、過去を未来につないで進む力です。その仕事は、いまあなた方の手に受け継がれました。50年前に、自由な社会が勝つかどうかについて、この大学の学生に投げかけられた問いの答えとして。
もしあなた方が、先輩たちと同じように、あなたがたの人生の時間の一部をこの国ためにささげることを願うなら、ケネディ大統領と同じように、私はそれが可能だと信じます。あなた方を信じています。)

アメリカ人の特別な運命について語る語り口には、日本人としては違和感があるが、その部分もふくめて、アメリカニズムを余すところなく伝える名演説だと思う。